A Heads Up About the Law

The Snow Sport Helmet Act will become law on November 1, 2012. It's a world-first, designed to keep our noggins safer on Nova Scotia's ski and snowboard hills. Brain injuries are the leading cause of death among skiers and snowboarders of all ages, and helmet use reduces the severity of injury by up to 60%.

There are a few more nuggets you should know about the law. If you're over 16, it's your responsibility to wear a snow sport helmet. Parents or guardians are responsible to ensure anyone under 16 in their care is wearing a helmet. Getting caught without a helmet could also cost you a $250.00 fine. So you might want to strap one on your head.

Find the Perfect Fit

When it's right, it's so right. If you follow a few simple guidelines, you'll be sure your helmet relationship is meant to last.

Cool

Wear your helmet so the padding inside touches your head with no large gaps. It shouldn't touch the back of your neck.

Cool

Make sure you can fit one finger under the chinstrap. The helmet should be snug and comfortable.

Cool

Make sure the helmet sits on your head so that two fingers can fit above the eyebrows.

Cool

Make sure there is little to no gap between the top of your goggles and the helmet. Take your goggles shopping with you to ensure they fit your helmet.

Not Cool

Don't wear a hat, except for a thin helmet liner. Nothing should get between you and your helmet.

Not Cool

Don't wear your hair in a high pony tail. Keep it on the down low.

Before you get serious,
check for the safety sticker.

It should have one of the four approved safety standards.
CSA, ASTM, EN or SNELL.

Don't Lower Your Standards

Maybe you meet your match right away. Maybe you play the field a little. Either way, make sure every helmet you flirt with meets industry standards. There are several different voluntary industry standards. The chart below outlines them for you.

To view details of each, select a standard from the drop down menu below.

Helmet Standard Shock Absorption Head Forms Field of Vision Impact Tests Anvils
CSA Z.263.1
Recreational Alpine Skiing and Snowboarding Helmets
The peak acceleration of any impact shall not exceed 250 g* Variable head form sizes used, with variable mass 105 degrees to the left and right sides of the median plane Multiple impact test procedure
(4 impact sites, 3 impacts per site)
Flat
ASTM-2040
Helmets used for Recreational Snow Sports
The peak acceleration of any impact shall not exceed 300 g* Variable head form sizes used, but mass is constant. 105 degrees to the left and right sides of the median plane Single impact per site
(2 impact sites using flat anvil, 1 impact site for hemispherical anvil, 1 impact site for edge anvil)
Flat, Hemispherical, and Edge
EN 1077
European Standard Helmets for Alpine Skiers and Snowboarders
The peak acceleration of any impact shall not exceed 250 g* Variable head form sizes used, but mass in constant 105 degrees to the left and right sides of the median plane Single impact test procedure
(2 impact sites per sample)
Flat
Snell RS-98
Protective Headgear for Recreational Skiing and Snowboarding
The peak acceleration of any impact shall not exceed 300 g* Variable head form sizes used, but mass in constant 105 degrees to the left and right sides of the median plane Single impact test procedure
(4 impact sites per sample)
Flat, Hemispherical, and Edge

*g is the acceleration due to Earth's gravity

Our Partners

A quick nod to our sponsors. If you need any more information or help finding your helmet match, these are your people.